Notice: Undefined index: deskr in /var/www/pic_com/parse2.php on line 102

Notice: Undefined index: deskr in /var/www/pic_com/parse2.php on line 109

Notice: Undefined index: price in /var/www/pic_com/parse2.php on line 176
1973 Bulova 224 Accuquartz Date & Day, Cal. 2242, Quartz-Controlled Tuning Fork

1973 Bulova 224 Accuquartz Date & Day, Cal. 2242, Quartz-Controlled Tuning Fork

1973 Bulova 224 Accuquartz Date & Day, Cal. 2242, Quartz-Controlled Tuning Fork

1973 Bulova 224 Accuquartz Date & Day, Cal. 2242, Quartz-Controlled Tuning ForkThis watch is in the permanent exhibition in the museum “Muse international d'horlogerie” in La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland.Literature:

“Electrifying the Wristwatch”

About the Authors:

Lucien F. Trueb, Gunther Ramm, and Peter Wenzig all have extensive experience in science and technology, as well as a passion for timepieces. Trueb lives in Switzerland; Ramm and Wenzig live in Germany.

Hardcover: 320 pages

Publisher: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. (July 28, 2013)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0764343041

ISBN-13: 978-0764343049

Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 1.3 x 12 inches.

The electrification of the watch led to massive upheaval in the watch industry as mechanical chronometers built by Old World masters developed into electromechanical devices mass produced in Asia. In nearly 600 images and in-depth text, this book retraces the often circuitous paths that led from the electromagnetic pendulum clock to the modern quartz wristwatch.

 gallery click to enlarge

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

Recommended cells / batteries for this watch: “Bulova 218”, or “Accutron 218” (1.35 Volt).

The 224 Accutron and Accuquartz movements are "sensitive" to higher voltages through the use of Silver Oxide batteries, which causes the watch to run too fast, if not properly adjusted (phased) by doing a transistor installation on the circuit, bringing the voltage of Silver Oxide battery from 1.55 to 1.35 Volt, to slow down the watch. The reason being that the timing comes from a quartz module, the tuning fork only being used to drive the hands (like on a 2242 Accuquartz), what a stepper now does for quartz watches. These are 45 year old watches now and you have to accept that the electronics will develop faults out of the blue. It's possible that a battery change (Silver Oxide battery) can cause that by adding a bit more "juice" all of a sudden in the circuit.

The Accuquartz Series 224 are subject to fluctuations in accuracy due to the higher voltage. They are generally not as difficult to phase as the Accutron Series 214 and 218. The increase in rate is not caused by a change in frequency, but by a change in amplitude of the oscillator (due to the higher magnetic "kick" from the coil). Using a variable voltage supply, as you crank the voltage up from 1.35V to 1.55V, you can literally "hear" the increase in amplitude as an increase in audible volume. With greater amplitude, the possibility of triple indexing (or intermittant triple indexing) is higher.

Also, for phasing, the finer adjustment of the pawl bridge via its screw (in comparison to the Accutron Series 214/218) improves the likelihood of finding a "sweet spot" for Silver Oxide (1.55v) cells. (The counter-balance and fine adjustment are also attributes shared with the ESA 9162 variants...making both very nice to phase). Although "quartz controlled", the "natural" frequency of the resonator should be adjusted to match the output of the quartz circuit...the adjustment has the practical effect of reducing current draw. As for 1.35v vs 1.55v and effect on the circuit; there is little to indicate that 1.55v is an issue. With the overhead designed in the circuit, it is unlikely that the component life is affected. Most damage seen in these circuits is due to other causes (eg. direct shorts and subsequent heat)...although capacitors do loose capacitance with age (which is sometimes a cause of failure in the transistorized circuits).

“The tuning fork in an Accuquartz is a slave, whose accuracy is controlled by the Quartz Crystal. Therefore, if a problem exists within the accuracy of the watch, which cannot be adjusted by regulating, and there is no mechanical problem, it is the Component Coil (#712), which contains the Quartz Crystal, that needs to be replaced. On the other hand, if the meter current drain is excessive, and there is no mechanical problem, it is usually a demagnetized fork that is causing the high current reading. The Tuning Fork must be replaced.” (Source: Technical Information Services, Bulova Watch Company, lnc.)

How to correctly Phase Bulova Accuquartz for Silver Oxide cells: How to correctly adjust an Accuquartz to run on silver oxide cells (remember, they were originally developed to be used with mercury cells of a lower voltage which are now discontinued for environmental reasons). Any Accuquartz that has been serviced and adjusted properly, can be made to work every bit as well as the day it came out of the factory. Phasing an Accuquartz is adjusting the index mechanism. The adjustment is done with the watch running and by observing the behavior of the index wheel when the watch is supplied with different voltages. When correctly adjusted, the watch will run at the right speed, in perfect synchrony with the vibrations of the quartz crystal oscillator. Accuquartz can be made to operate on the higher voltage Silver Oxide cells and still retain enough overhead at the upper voltage range to run acceptably well, still within Bulova specs. So, this leaves us with the possibility of phasing the watch at the high voltage end, and not having to worry at all about the lower voltage end, as a Silver Oxide cell is considered exhausted when it reaches 1.4v - already higher than the maximum voltage of a mercury cell. It takes experience and understanding to know what is possible for any given watch, when to change out parts, persist with re-phasing or decide an cell “Accuquartz 218”, or cell 343 (original, mercury) is the best choice. But, having said that, it is possible to get virtually any Accuquartz, one way or another, to work to the original factory specs.

The accuracy of which sets the rate of the watch, is under the control of a quartz crystal oscillator The fork and index mechanism is basically used as a stepper motor. Nevertheless, the fork has to be "tuned" anyway, so that it vibrates at as close to the output frequency of the quartz circuit as possible. Slight variations from this theoretical frequency will cause the watch to draw more power from the battery than necessary, but not affect its rate.

Bulova Technical Bulletin Accuquartz Series 224

(from Technical Information Services, Bulova Watch Company, lnc., 75-20 Astoria Blvd., Jackson Heights, N.Y. 11377, U.S.A.):

Introduction:

The Series 224 Accuquartz is basically an Accutron Series 218 with some modifications. The most significant difference is the addition of a Quartz Crystal Oscillator to an already proven and established timepiece. Although some parts, regulation and minor adjustments may differ, the Series 224 and Series 218 are very similar to each other in basic servicing procedures.

Tools:

The basic tools and equipment necessary for servicing the Accutron Series 218 are also employed in servicing the Accuquartz 224. In addition, a Quartz Crystal Deviation Counter with 32,768 Hz pickup is required. When phasing, an I.C. (integrated circuit) Phasing Attachment (Accuquartz Service Kit #224/6601) is used in conjunction with the basic 218 movement holder. Also, an abbreviated meter scale is necessary. (Accuquartz Service Kit #224/6602).

Servicing:

Disassembly, cleaning, lubrication and reassembly including calendar, INDEX ADJUSTMENT and PHASING (with a minor variation) is done in exactly the same manner as the Series 218. When necessary, please refer to the 218 manual for servicing the Accuquartz 224.

Note, connection points for leads and that the probe of the attachment must be in contact with the I.C. Package.”

Where can I get my Accuquartz fixed ?:

Don't send it back to Bulova !!!  They will replace the tuning fork movement with a quartz (yeuch) one and you will have lost a valuable piece of horological history. In general high street jewellers will tell you it can't be fixed and that no parts are available: WRONG ! 

For the US and the rest of the world then here are a few alternatives.

USA:

John Schult's Budget Accutron Service  

and in Australia  The Accutron Watch Page

1973 Bulova 224 Accuquartz Date & Day, Cal. 2242, Quartz-Controlled Tuning Fork

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

1973 Bulova 224 Accuquartz Date & Day, Cal. 2242, Quartz-Controlled Tuning Fork

Literature, Max Hetzel (inventor of the watch):

1963

General Analysis of the Wristwatch Problem in View of Electricity and Electronics, British Horological Journal  

1964

Die Elektronik im Dienste der Feintechnik, Technische Rundschau, Nr. 6 vom 14.02.64 Sonderdruck ETH, Probleme der Feintechnik, 63/64

Die Stimmgabel als Frequenznormal und ihre Verwendung in der elektronischen Uhr, Technische Rundschau Nr. 19 vom 26.04.63 Journal Suisse d'Horlogerie Nr. 3-12 65 bis Nr. 1-6 66 Die Uhr (Fachzeitschrift in Deutschland) Nr. 16 vom 15.08.64, Nr. 19 vom 09.10.64, Nr 20 vom 25.10.64, Nr. 22 vom 25.11.64  

Die elektrische Uhr, Technische Rundschau Nr. 49 vom 27.11.64

1965

Wozu elektronische Armbanduhren?, Suisse Horlogere Nr 35, 16.09.65

1967

Evolution de la montre mecanique. Synthese, Journal Suisse d'Horlog,rie Nr 9/10,1967  

1969

Armbanduhren mit elektromechanischen Schwingern, AGEN Mitteilungen Nr. 10, Sept. 69

Interview: Swiss Watch and Jewelry Journal International Edition 04.07.69

1973

Montre a Resonateur Sonore Omega Megasonic f 720 Journal Suisse d'Horlogerie ¾

1974

Interview: La Suisse Horlogere Nr 39, 16.10.75  

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

1973 Bulova 224 Accuquartz Date & Day, Cal. 2242, Quartz-Controlled Tuning Fork

The Bulova Accuquartz is the only example of a quartz controlled tuning fork that was ever produced.  

Bulova timepieces use only the finest materials, precision craftsmanship and state-of-the-art technology for enduring quality and performance.At the heart of each Bulova watch is precision accuracy. From the finest quartz movements to alternative technologies such as solar or mechanical energy, each Bulova watch is guaranteed to be accurate to within one minute a year.Every Bulova is anti-magnetic, shock-resistant, and features the unique distortion-free and scratch-resistant “Dura-Crystal”.Designed in America and handcrafted in Switzerland, each Accuquartz watch combines exceptional styling with the most advanced timekeeping technology. In the world of luxury watches, Accuquartz stands alone by offering:

The finest Swiss quartz movements available and superior scratch-resistant crystals.For hundreds of years, precision timekeeping was strictly mechanical. Then Bulova transformed the course of time forever with the world's first fully electronic watch . . .: “Accutron”. A vital component of the U.S. space program from the 1958 launch of Vanguard I through the first moonwalk in 1969, Accutron revolutionized the watchmaking industry by bringing its state-of-the-art timing mechanism directly to consumers. Today, building on this extraordinary legacy, Accutron / Accuquartz remains at the forefront of watchmaking technology, and is produced with strict adherence to Bulova's quality standards. 

In 1927, Charles A. Lindbergh became the first solo pilot to cross the Atlantic nonstop. His crossing earned him a Bulova Watch and a check for $1000, and it became an emblem for the brand that created the model "Lone Eagle" in his likeness. 

In 1971 quartz watches had just entered the scene at the very top of the market, but stories were filtering down about this technology’s impeccable accuracy. This was serious stuff for Bulova who had for the previous 17 years the only worthwhile electronic watch on the market.  The Accutron’s only claim to fame was its accuracy, matched only by the very best chronometers but now there was a serious rival on the horizon.

So Bulova renamed this “Accutron” the “Accuquartz” cashing in on the latest word in advanced technology. It also has a quartz crystal looking thing on the dial.

Bulova went on producing the tuning fork Accutron until 1977. This uses the latest 2242. Has very nice hands and dial with day and date. It is signed four times; the dial, movement, back and crown.

The Accuquartz has been somewhat overlooked, because quartz movements were cheaper to manufacture. As a result Accuquartz watches are quite rare.

Many versions of Accuquartz were produced from 1972 to 1976/77.

Timekeeping accuracy is controlled by a tiny vacuum-diapason high-precision quartz crystal which vibrates at an exact frequency of 32,789 cycles per second (Hz), which moves the tuning fork which drives the hands via the indexing mechanism. The fork and index mechanism is basically used as a stepper motor. The crystal quartz has a more than twice as high frequency than a commercialized quartz watch crystal. This is the first quartz watch to have a date and day. The Bulova Accuquartz is the only example of a quartz controlled tuning fork that was ever produced.

The precision of this watch is estimated at 1 to 2 seconds per week. (Whereas the “Accutron” was guaranteed to be accurate to a minute per month, or 2 seconds per day, considerably better than mechanical watches of the time.)

The Bulova management claimed an accuracy of 3 minutes per year for the 224 calibers, which was a 400% improvement over the normal Accutron.

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

I bought this watch at an Italian auction house, a few years ago.

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

Dimensions: Ca. 37mm x 43mm (without the crown, and lug to lug).

Trademark: BULOVA

Model: ACCUQUARTZ 2242 Day-Date: Sweep Second, Day and Date display. Designer, attr., or inspired by: Frank Lloyd Wright. His work heralded a new thinking in architecture, stressing "organic" structures in harmony with their natural surroundings. Electronically quartz-controlled tuning fork.

Manufacture Year: 1973 (prod. period: 1972 – 1976/77).

Manufacturer: Bulova Watch Company Inc., Bulova Headquarters, Bulova Park, Long Island, New York, U.S.A. / Bulova Watch Company Inc., Biel/Bienne, Switzerland. The factory in Biel was closed in 1983. The the index and pawl jewels where made by Bulova Watch Co., Neuchatel, Switzerland.

History: 

http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences-and-law/economics-business-and-labor/businesses-and-occupations/bulova-corp

The CEO of Bulova at the time, was Omar Bradley, 5 Star General, US Army, retired. Bradley was instrumental in running Bulova, but he was also committed to the rehabilitation of U.S. military veterans into society, training former soldiers at Bulova’s watchmaking school, and using Bulova’s program as a blueprint for retraining soldiers after their military service. He also helped Bulova become not only a watchmaking company, but a maker of critical timing instruments for military and aerospace applications, especially during the Cold War.

Bulova is not a Swiss company, but made Swiss made watches (Accutron and Accuquartz). Bulova is an American watch company that was founded in New York City in 1875. In the 1970’s the company started losing money and thereafter was traded / sold several times.

The Accutron line of watches from Bulova has struggled for many years with an identity crisis. The name Accutron came from “Accuracy through Electronics”, when it was born.

Born in October of 1960, the revolutionary turning fork timepiece, hailed at the time as the most accurate wristwatch ever made (or for that matter, the most accurate timekeeping device of any kind), it held the spotlight in the watch world for about ten years and was the major stepping stone between mechanical watches and quartz, until it was surpassed by the very watch it paved the way for. Hoping to cash in on the tremendous brand value it had created as a higher-end Bulova watch, it made the transition to quartz but as this technology went from being very expensive to very cheap in a very short timespan, it found itself awash in a sea of very inexpensive, unremarkable watches that could all lay claim to the same level of accuracy. As the industry made the switch and prices fell, there was very little to differentiate the Accutron brand from even a standard Bulova, much less watches from Timex, the low price leader of the time.

Dimensions: Ca. 37mm (without the crown) x ca. 43mm.

Tuning Fork Frequency: 341 1/3 Hz

Country of Origin: Switzerland

The inventor, Max Hetzel, was born in Basel, Switzerland, and joined the Bulova Watch Company of Biel/Bienne, Switzerland, in 1948.

Condition: Fine vintage condition. Gently used with few micro-scratches and dents, that can be seen with a loop.

Dimensions: Ca. 37mm x 43mm (without the crown, and lug to lug).

Strap: Genuine leather. Black lizard leather.

Dial: Signed BULOVA ACCUQUARTZ under 12 o'clock, Day and Date at 3 o"clock and the Accuquartz symbol with a quartz crystal at 6 o'clock. Sweep Second, Day-Date (Italian day wheel) . Dial color: gray. 

Day: set by changing 18-24h. 

Date: “quickset”. Mechanical hack feature.

Crystal: Doomed scratch-resistant mineral or acryl glass “Dura-Crystal”, with no visible scratches, digs or cracks. (But I am not sure, if this is the original crystal.)

Crown: Stainless steel crown. Original Crown with Bulova logo. 

To protect the ratchet system (index system), the Accuquartz watch may be set only by turning the hands in a forward direction.

Day: set by changing 18-24h. 

Date: “quickset”. Mechanical hack feature.

 

Watch Case: Monobloc case with stainless steel back. Solid stainless steel construction. Water resistant. Water-resistance is 50 meters. Antimagnetic. Designer, attr., or inspired by: Frank Lloyd Wright. His work heralded a new thinking in architecture, stressing "organic" structures in harmony with their natural surroundings.

Case Serial No.: 3-784257

Case Back: Marked in capital letters: “Patented Bulova, Stainless Steel, Water resistant  3-784257”.

Case shape: Monobloc, corner cut: "organic" structures.

Case Manufacturer: Bulova

Battery / Power Source: Cell "Bulova 218", or "Accuquartz 218", or Cell 343 (original, mercury), or Cell 344 (replacement, Silver Odixe). 

Movement Jewels: 15

Movement: Copper electroplated Movement. Bulova in-house caliber: BULOVA 224; Sub-Caliber: BULOVA 2242. Electronically quartz-controlled tuning fork.

2242 Accuquartz movement, combining a tuning fork with a Quartz regulator. Patented Bulova, U.S.A., Swiss made.

The bridge is copper electroplated. The tuning fork tines are made of NiSpan C. The cups are made of iron with low carbon, and the magnets are made of Alnico. The index and pawl fingers are made of NiSpan C. The plastic cell coil and component coil moldings are made of diallyl phthalate.

The coils: the driving coil has 8,000 turns made of wire with a diameter of 0.015 mm and an incredible length of about 90 meters.

The two copper colored circles inside the triangular cut-out of the bridge are the attachment points for the arms holding the index jewel, and the pawl jewel. 

Timekeeping accuracy is controlled by a tiny vacuum-diapason high-precision quartz crystal which vibrates at an exact frequency of 32,789 cycles per second (Hz), which moves the tuning fork which drives the hands via the indexing mechanism. The fork and index mechanism is basically used as a stepper motor. 

Turning the linear motion of the tuning fork into a circular motion for the watch hands is done by using an impulse jewel connected to the fork, which pushes an "index wheel" forward one tooth at a time. (A second pawl jewel prevents the index wheel from slipping backwards.) 

The tuning fork is no longer the source of stable frequency. It is only used as a motor that moves the hands (by means of a pawl and index finger) but additionally it is controlled by the electronic circuit which serves as the source of frequency.

The index wheel (ratchet wheel) is an extraordinary piece of engineering. It has 320 teeth, each only 0.01 mm high, and it is only 2.4 millimeters in diameter and 0.04 mm thick.

Inventor of the movement: Max Hetzel, born in Basel, Switzerland.

“The Bulova Accuquartz is the only example of a quartz controlled tuning fork that was ever produced. The Longines Ultra-Quartz has many similarities but is not the same and is considerably more complex.

In the Accuquartz, the tuning fork has become “passive” and is no longer responsible for regulating the watch; it is only there to drive the hands via the unchanged indexing mechanism. However, the adjusters on the tuning fork cups still need to be “tuned” to the quartz to ensure optimum battery consumption.

Instead, the movement is regulated by either engaging or dis-engaging internal capacitors in the quartz circuitry; this is achieved by small brass screws which are either added or removed from the 6 small holes on the left hand side of the movement.” Source: Electric Watches

“The 224 Accuquartz by Bulova is their first in-house "quartz" watch based on their last tuning fork 218 movement. After the initial limited Beta21- Accuquartz batch, that sold only in 1971 in large solid 18K gold cases (100g), Bulova quit cooperation with CEH and decided to continue on their own in the mass-market Quartz race. The race in the field of research was pretty much lost and legend has it, that Bulova's management didn't even consider Quartz to be a threat (like most traditional manufacturers in those days that went bankrupt). So in order to cut costs and speed up the invention process they revitalized the old 218 tuning fork caliber and added a few minor modifications with small chip and 32.768Hz quartz on top.

This 224 Accuquartz appeared in 1972 (N2 code) and with dozens of designs was proudly marketed as Quartz until approx. 1976. It was also made in high-grade for Universal Geneve as "UniQuartz". The concept is simple but the tuning fork is no longer the source of stable frequency. It is only used as a motor that moves the hands (by means of a pawl and index finger) but additionally it is controlled by the electronic circuit which serves as the source of frequency. This idea is practically a copy of the Beta21 but also similar to the Ultra-Quartz with one-way communication to the motor. Timekeeping can be adjusted the same way with small screws on the circuit which activate corresponding resistors (do not manipulate unless timekeeping is completely out of line).” Source: crazywatches.pl

“This was the last of the Bulova tuning fork watches. Although it is very similar in construction to the 218, it differs markedly in its concept of operation. In previous Accutrons, the accuracy of the watch was dependent on the fork vibrating at exactly the right frequency, which in the 218 is 360 Hz. In the 224 however, the tuning fork is "passive", it just vibrates away, under the control of a quartz crystal oscillator, the accuracy of which sets the rate of the watch. The fork and index mechanism is basically used as a stepper motor. Nevertheless, the fork has to be "tuned" anyway, so that it vibrates at as close to the output frequency of the quartz circuit as possible. Slight variations from this theoretical frequency will cause the watch to draw more power from the battery than necessary, but not affect its rate.

The quartz crystal circuit of the 224 oscillates at 32,768 Hz. The 224 tuning fork resonates at 341 1/3 Hz. Sounds like a strange number for a tuning fork at first glance. Why 341 1/3 you ask? Because the 32,768 Hz from the crystal is divided by the electronic circuitry by 96 (div. by 32, then by 3) and that works out to 341 1/3. Very convenient from an electronics point of view. Why a 32,768 Hz crystal you ask? Because 32,768 Hz is equal to 215, which is a number easily handled by digital electronics (and the chip that drives the 224), and thus a frequency readily available from crystal manufacturers. To get special crystals would have incurred a significant lead time (and I imagine cost too).

The rest of the watch may be considered very similar to a normal 218. The only slight differences being on how the index mechanism is "phased" (adjusted), and also that the fork has to be tuned to the quartz oscillator, and a slight change to the train (see below). Bulova supplied a special jig for phasing the index mechanism and adjusting the fork.

One is tempted to ask "why on earth did Bulova consider such an unusual - even bizarre - design for a watch movement?" It wasn't exactly their idea, such a watch design was preceded by the Omega Beta21, and Longines Ultra-quartz. This was a way of achieving the accuracy of a quartz watch without having to re-tool their assembly line too much. They had already almost missed the boat as it was, as Bulova management had virtually ignored all warnings about the new quartz technology, believing it was nothing more than a passing fad. So I think they may have panicked, realizing that they effectively had missed out on a few years of development time, and had to pull a rabbit out of a hat. Thus, the 224 was created. They claimed an accuracy of 3 minutes per year for the 224, which was a 400% improvement over the normal Accutron. The next obvious step was to dispense with the fork altogether, and this was done with the Model 242, which had a miniature electric stepping motor, controlled by a quartz oscillator, driving the gear train. Of course, the indexing mechanism was no longer needed either.

There is not a whole lot to be seen in the circuit above. Most of the electronics are contained within the integrated circuit. We can deduce that the integrated circuit will contain a crystal oscillator drive circuit, a divider of the ratio 215, and an output drive transistor. The rate of the watch is adjusted by adding or subtracting capacitors to the oscillator circuit by means of including or excluding very small screws, each screw location having a specific value of time associated with it. This has the effect of slightly "pulling" the frequency of the crystal to fine-tune it.

Given that the 224 is essentially the same as a 218, but with different electronics and a tuning fork that vibrates at 341 1/3 Hz instead of 360 Hz, you are no doubt asking the question, as I did, "how did they make the hands turn at the right speed if the fork is vibrating at a slower rate? Did they reduce the number of teeth on the index wheel to compensate, and if so, how did they account for the 1/3 of a Hz in the fork frequency of 341 1/3 Hz. After all, you can't have a wheel with 1/3 of a tooth on it?!"

Well, the answer is, that Bulova changed the ratio of two gears in the train. And it's amazing that the numbers work out perfectly, not only in the electronics which provides the 341 1/3 Hz frequency, but in the gear train too.” Source: Bob Berkavicius

Movement, plating:

Copper electroplated, directly onto the base material, with special treatment, for great hardness. Note that this copper plating was used on the higher quality varieties of the BULOVA watch movements. About the "Rose Gold" copper finish of the watch movement: Contents: beryllium bronze, a copper-base alloy containing 2.25% beryllium; this alloy responds to temper-hardening, developing great hardness after suitable treatment.

Features:

electronically quartz-controlled tuning forksweep secondday: set by changing 18-24hdate: quicksetmechanical hack featureData:12.5''', Dm=Do= 28.75mmH= 5.5mmT= 2.6mm15 jewelsf = 3411/3Hz / 32768 Hztuning fork / quartzStem: Bulova 2240.

Index Wheel: 320 teethBattery: 343 (original, mercury), 344 (replacement, silver odixe).Hands: 1.40 x 0.85 x 0.18mm.

Price: 450 Euro.

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

Payment method: Bank transfer. No PayPal. No.

Write a review

Note: HTML is not translated!
    Bad           Good
  • Product Code:
  • Availability: In Stock
0 Product(s) Sold
  • $0.00
  • Ex Tax: $0.00
Fiori artificiali | Butlers: Chitose Momotose Monogatari | Communiation